News

June 9, 2020
summer 2015

Probiotics: promise, evidence, and hope

Although the concept of beneficial bacteria is no longer novel, in recent decades there has been increasing attention paid to the potential effects of probiotics. Generally, existing research supports that probiotics have rather limited benefits that extend only to specific conditions. While probiotics may be limited, microbial therapeutics including Intestinal Microbiota Transplants (IMT) are increasingly being used to treat specific diseases and conditions.

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May 12, 2020
summer 2015

Gut Feeling

For the U of M's Microbiota Therapeutics Program team, this work is personal. Amanda Kabage's life saving Intestinal Microbiota Transplant not only gave her health back, but a new career focus.

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April 7, 2020
summer 2015

Air Pollution Alters Gut Microbiome and Increases Risk For Diabetes

Exposure to air pollution alters gut microbiome composition, subsequently increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses.

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March 20, 2020
summer 2015

Gut bacteria may boost cancer therapy by colonizing tumors.

A study in mice suggests that by infiltrating tumors and ramping up the body’s immune response, a type of gut bacteria could be a valuable ally in cancer treatment.

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March 3, 2020
summer 2015

Butterflies in your tummy? New Australian study links anxiety and childhood gut bacteria.

The study, a collaborative work conducted by researchers from Deakin University, Barwon Health and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) – is the first to show that children with a lower amount of Prevotella at age one are more likely to have anxiety-like behaviours at two, supporting what Harvard researchers have termed “the gut-brain connection”.

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February 26, 2020
summer 2015

Specific gut bacteria linked to blood pressure

Researchers have identified a distinct collection of bacteria found in the gut that may contribute to, and predict, the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

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February 11, 2020
summer 2015

What’s the link between autism and gut bacteria? Gut bacteria may contribute to the development of autism-like behaviors.

A long term study investigating the impact of microbiota therapy on Autism Spectrum Disorder symptoms was completed at the Arizona State University. The treatment protocol included antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, and a high dose of Intestinal Microbiota Transfer. Prior to treatment, 83% of the children were classified as “severe” on the autism spectrum. At the two-year post-treatment follow up, only 17% classified as severe and 44% of the children fell below the Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnostic cut-off point.

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February 5, 2020
summer 2015

Because the World Needs Superheroes, These Doctors Work to Advance Medical Research and Save Lives

Achieving Cures Together is honored to be highlighted with Dr. Khoruts and the University of Minnesota's Microbiota Therapeutics Program for our development of encapsulated microbiota.

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January 21, 2020
summer 2015

OSU Studies Gut Microbiome Compositions and Links To Children’s Behavior

A study of early school-aged children shows a connection between the bacteria in their gut and their behavior, and that parents play a key role in their kids’ microbiome beyond the food they provide. The analysis showed that children with behavioral problems and higher socioeconomic stress had different microbiome profiles than those who didn’t, and also that the quality of the parent-child relationship, as well as parental stress, played a role in how pronounced those differences were.

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December 10, 2019
summer 2015

Altered Gut Microbiota Could Be Therapeutic Target in Rett Syndrome, Study Suggests

The altered gut bacteria found in girls with Rett syndrome influence their gastrointestinal symptoms and disease severity, making the gut microbiota a potential therapeutic target, a review study reports.

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