News

November 12, 2019
summer 2015

Researchers project that by 2050, the rate of infections resistant to antibiotics is likely to grow to 40%.

The Council of Canadian Acadamies comprehensive assessment of the current and future impact of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) predicts that the rate of resistance will grow from 26% in 2018 to 40% in 2050. The CCR also analyzes the implications of AMR to public health, the economy, industry & quality of life.

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November 4, 2019
summer 2015

A type of gut bacteria may increase risk of bowel cancer

New research presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference has shown that people with a certain type of bacteria in their guts may be more likely to develop bowel cancer.

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October 14, 2019
summer 2015

Gut bacteria can prevent and cure rotavirus infection

The presence of specific microbiota, or microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, can prevent and cure rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe, life-threatening diarrhea in children worldwide, according to a new study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

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October 6, 2019
summer 2015

Congratulations 2019 Robert E. Wilkins Award Winner, Amanda Kabage!

Achieving Cures Together is proud to recognize Amanda Kabage as the 2019 Robert E. Wilkens award winner. This award was created in honor of the late Robert E. Wilkens, who was dedicated in both life and legacy to finding cures and providing healing through Microbiota Therapeutics research. We are honored each year to recognize an outstanding member of the community who is continuing this mission. Amanda has an inspiring story and brings a unique perspective, passion, and determination to her life-saving work every single day. In 2012, Amanda was suffering from an antibiotic resistant superbug, Clostridium difficile. She battled this horrific superbug for 14 months and quickly found herself unable to work, travel, exercise, or participate in things she loved to do. Frustrated by this debilitating superbug and the standard antibiotic treatment cycles, she started researching a novel therapy now known as Intestinal Microbiota Transplant (IMT). In 2013, Amanda was given an IMT by Dr. Khoruts at the University of Minnesota and was healed! Through her direct experience, Amanda changed career paths from pediatric cancer research and joined the University of Minnesota Microbiota Therapeutics team. As an integral member of the team, Amanda helped establish the first stool donor program in the world, has been involved in countless groundbreaking microbiome research studies, and has inspired, given hope, and helped cure many suffering patients. In 2016, Robert Wilkens met Amanda at an Achieving Cures Together meeting. He was very impressed with her and at that moment, knew Amanda was a key player in microbial restoration research. Robert would be extremely proud to know that Amanda carries on his legacy today and Achieving Cures Together is honored to present this award to such a deserving individual.

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October 4, 2019
summer 2015

Microbiome Provides New Clues to Determining Development of Colon Cancer

A mutant protein found in humans with colon cancer blocks a pathway that regulates proliferation and expansion of cells, increasing amounts of bacterial species associated with the development of colon cancer. These findings, showcasing the connection between bacteria in the microbiome and colon cancer, were published by a team of researchers from the George Washington University (GW) in the journal Gastroenterology.

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September 16, 2019
summer 2015

Pioneering microbiome findings shed light on aspiration

A study at Boston Children's Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sheds light on the interactions between the lung and gastrointestinal microbiomes. These findings point to the possibility of one day identifying biomarkers for aspiration based on the presence of certain bacteria in both the lungs and the oropharynx.

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September 3, 2019
summer 2015

Diet's effect on gut bacteria could play role in reducing Alzheimer's risk

This study suggests that Alzheimer's disease is associated with specific changes in gut bacteria and that a type of ketogenic Mediterranean diet can affect the microbiome in ways that could impact the development of dementia.

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August 26, 2019
summer 2015

Cleaning up an image: the crusade to rename fecal microbiota transplant

The adjusted terminology – intestinal microbiota transplant – merely shifts the focus from the donor to the recipient. The patients are getting an intestinal microbiota transplant because their own intestinal microbiota requires repair. We’re certainly not trying to fix someone’s feces.

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July 22, 2019
summer 2015

Gut Microbiome May Alter ALS Progression in Mice

In 1993, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was linked to a genetic mutation in the SOD1 gene. It was a landmark discovery, as were others like it at the time linking neurological diseases to heritable, genetic sources. For example, APO-E, the gene linked to Alzheimer’s disease, was discovered in the same year and the gene for Parkinson’s disease just a few years later.

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July 12, 2019
summer 2015

Belly fat: gut bacteria checks could lead to personalised diets

Rates of obesity are rising across the globe; a third of the world’s population is now overweight and nearly a fifth is obese. Public health policy has mainly focused on diet to reverse these rising rates, but the impact of these policies has been limited. The latest science suggests why this strategy is failing: one diet does not fit all. Dietary advice needs to be personalised.

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