News

September 3, 2019
summer 2015

Diet's effect on gut bacteria could play role in reducing Alzheimer's risk

This study suggests that Alzheimer's disease is associated with specific changes in gut bacteria and that a type of ketogenic Mediterranean diet can affect the microbiome in ways that could impact the development of dementia.

read more
August 26, 2019
summer 2015

Cleaning up an image: the crusade to rename fecal microbiota transplant

The adjusted terminology – intestinal microbiota transplant – merely shifts the focus from the donor to the recipient. The patients are getting an intestinal microbiota transplant because their own intestinal microbiota requires repair. We’re certainly not trying to fix someone’s feces.

read more
July 22, 2019
summer 2015

Gut Microbiome May Alter ALS Progression in Mice

In 1993, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was linked to a genetic mutation in the SOD1 gene. It was a landmark discovery, as were others like it at the time linking neurological diseases to heritable, genetic sources. For example, APO-E, the gene linked to Alzheimer’s disease, was discovered in the same year and the gene for Parkinson’s disease just a few years later.

read more
July 12, 2019
summer 2015

Belly fat: gut bacteria checks could lead to personalised diets

Rates of obesity are rising across the globe; a third of the world’s population is now overweight and nearly a fifth is obese. Public health policy has mainly focused on diet to reverse these rising rates, but the impact of these policies has been limited. The latest science suggests why this strategy is failing: one diet does not fit all. Dietary advice needs to be personalised.

read more
July 11, 2019
summer 2015

To tackle childhood malnutrition, researchers turn to the microbiome

Nearly half of all deaths worldwide in children under the age of 5 is from malnutrition. And those who manage to survive suffer long-term consequences, such as stunted growth and delays in neurodevelopment.

read more
July 10, 2019
summer 2015

The importance of the first 1000 days of life

Think about this: from the moment you are conceived until you are 1000 days old, your growth is exponential, faster than in any other period of life. For the first 9 months, you go from two cells to a newborn measuring 50cm in length and 3 kg weight. Then, between birth and 3 years of age, your body size doubles and your weight increasing your five-fold.

read more
July 9, 2019
summer 2015

The Right Cocktail of Gut Microbes may Prevent or Reverse Food Allergies

Scientists have now discovered that one type of bacteria that lives in the infant gastrointestinal tract can prevent the development of food allergies. The research, which showed that when the human gut is exposed to a group of five or six bacterial species it can reverse established allergies, has been reported in Nature Medicine.

read more
July 3, 2019
summer 2015

Bacterial Supplement May Cut Risk of Heart Disease in Obese People

A small study found that a particular bacterium positively changed metabolic markers in "obese and overweight human volunteers".

read more
July 3, 2019
summer 2015

Antibiotics Damage Microbiome-Supported Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Lung

Research in mice has shown how antibiotic use can leave the lungs susceptible to flu virus infections. The studies, headed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, found that gut bacteria play an important role in driving interferon (IFN) signaling in non-immune cells in the lung lining, which help to maintain a first line of defense against flu infection. So, while about 80% of mice with healthy gut microbiota survived when infected with flu virus, only about a third of animals survived the flu if they had been pretreated with antibiotics.

read more
June 24, 2019
summer 2015

Performance-enhancing bacteria found in the microbiomes of elite athletes

The study of elite athlete's gut bacteria showed that the bacterium Veillonella atypica could be associated with an increase in human/ exercise performance. An interesting find, illustrating that these marathon runners had the bacterium in common.

read more

Sign up for our Newsletter

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form